Diferenças entre edições de "História da Mitologia/XXXIII"

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<center>== Eneias na Itália ==</center>
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[[Ficheiro:Aeneas and Turnus.jpg|thumb|400px|center|<center>[[:w:Turno|Turno]] é derrotado por [[:w:Eneias|Eneias]]<br>ilustração de [[:w:Luca Giordano|Luca Giordano]] (1634–1705)</center>]]
Eneias, having parted from a Sibila and rejoined his fleet, coasted along the shores of Italy and cast anchor in the mouth of the Tiber. The poet, having brought his hero to this spot, the destined termination of his wanderings, invokes his Musa to tell him the situation of things at that eventful moment. Latino, third in descent from Saturno, ruled the country. He was now old and had no male descendant, but had one charming daughter, Lavínia, who was sought in marriage by many neighboring chiefs, one of whom, [[:w:Turno|Turno]], king of the Rutulians, was favored by the wishes of her parents. But Latino had been warned in a dream by his father Faunus, that the destined husband of Lavínia should come from a foreign land. From that union should spring a race destined to subdue the world.
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== A abertura do portão do templo de [[:w:Jano|Jano]] ==
 
[[Ficheiro:Young Folks' History of Rome illus042.png|thumb|400px|center|<center>A face dupla de Jano representa sua visão do passado e do futuro.<br>ilustração da obra História de Roma para a Juventude, de [[:w:Charlotte Mary Yonge|Charlotte Mary Yonge]] (1823-1901)</center>]]
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[[Ficheiro:Young Folks' History of Rome illus042.png|thumb|400px|center|<center>A face dupla de Jano representa sua visão do passado e do futuro.<br>ilustração da obra História de Roma para a Juventude, de [[:w:Charlotte Mary Yonge|Charlotte Mary Yonge]] (1823-1901)</center>]]
 
It was the custom of the country, when war was to be undertaken, for the chief magistrate, clad in his robes of office, with solemn pomp to open the gates of the temple of Jano, which were kept shut as long as peace endured. His people now urged the old king to perform that solemn office, but he refused to do so. While they contested, Juno herself, descending from the skies, smote the doors with irresistible force, and burst them open. Immediately the whole country was in a flame. The people rushed from every side breathing nothing but war.